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Bath Oxford Train

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About Bath

The city of Bath in Somerset in the south west of England is perhaps most famous for its Roman Baths and for its architecture particularly Lansdown Crescent, the Royal Crescent, The Circus and Pulteney Bridge. The city is approximately 100 miles to the west of London and 15 miles to the south east of Bristol.

The city became a spa with the Latin name Aquae Sulis ("the waters of Sulis") at around AD 60 when the Romans built the baths and a temple in the city. The city became a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1987. However, there is more to the city than its baths and architecture. The city's theatres, museums and other cultural and sporting venues are major draws for over 4 million visitors each year.

Royal Victoria Park, which is a short walk from the city centre, was opened in 1830 by Princess Victoria (later Queen Victoria) and was the first park to carry her name. The park is overlooked by the Royal Crescent and covers around 23 hectares. Contained within the park is a skate park, tennis courts, bowling green, a putting green, two golf courses, a children's play area and an open air concert venue.

About Oxford

The historic university city of Oxford is located in the county of Oxfordshire and is roughly 35 miles to the east of Cheltenham and 30 miles to the south west of Milton Keynes. Although known for its university the economy of Oxford is also reliant on car making, publishing, science and technology, bellfounding and brewing. Several of the University's colleges had private breweries which includes Brasenose College whose brewery survived until 1889.

Oxford used to be an important port of the River Thames, although the section of the Thames that runs through Oxford is called The Isis. To accommodate commercial traffic the Oxford-Burcot Commission in the 17th century took steps to improve the navigability of the river. The Oxford Canal was constructed in the 18th century in order to connect Oxford with the Midlands. Commercial traffic has given way to recreational use of the river and canal. Oxford was the original base of Salters Steamers and there is a regular service from Folly Bridge downstream to Abingdon and beyond.

Interesting attractions in the city include the Ashmolean Museum, the Bodleian Library, Christ Church Cathedral, The Headington Shark, the Museum of History and Science and the Oxford University Museum of Natural History.