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Brighton Bristol Train

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About Brighton

Brighton is located on the south coast of England and lies between the South Downs and the English Channel to the north and south respectively. The Sussex coast forms a wide, shallow bay between the headlands of Selsey Bill and Beachy Head.

The Lanes form a retail, leisure and residential area located near the sea front and is charecterised by narrow alleyways following the street pattern of the original fishing village. The Lanes contains mainly clothing shops, jewelers, restaurants and pubs. Brighton's main retail centre is the Churchill Square shopping centre which has over 80 shops, restaurants and parking for 1,600 cars.

Brighton has many important landmarks including The Royal Pavilion which is a former royal palace which was built as a home for the Prince Regent during the early 19th century. The construction of the palace was undertaken under the direction of architect John Nash. Other notable landmarks include Brighton Marine Palace and Pier (known as the Palace Pier) which opened in 1899. It contains a funfair, restaurants and arcade halls. The West Pier was built in 1866 and is one of only two Grade I listed piers in the UK but is closed to the public since 1975.

About Bristol

The city of Bristol, which borders the counties of Gloucestershire and Somerset, has always prospered due to its ties to the sea. The city's commercial Port of Bristol was originally located on the heart of the city but was moved to Avonmouth on the Severn Estuary. Royal Portbury Dock lies to the west of the city. Additionally, Bristol has a long history as a centre of culture and as such is the largest cultural centre in the region. In recent years the city's economy has increasingly depended on the creative media, electronics and aerospace industry. The site of the former docks in the city centre have been regenerated as a centre of heritage and culture. The city's principal theatre company, the Bristol Old Vic, was founded in 1946 as an offshoot of The Old Vic company in London. Its premises on King Street consist of the 1766 Theatre Royal which has 607 seats, a modern studio theatre called the New Vic which has 150 seats, and foyer and bar areas in the adjacent Coopers' Hall (built 1743).

Bristol is located in an area of limestone which runs from the Mendip Hill to the south to the Cotswolds to the north east. The River Avon flows from nearby Bath and created a gorge, the Avon Gorge, which helped to protect Bristol Harbour.