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Brighton Cardiff Train

Thinking about travelling by train from England to Wales between Brighton and Cardiff?

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About Brighton

Brighton is located on the south coast of England and lies between the South Downs and the English Channel to the north and south respectively. The Sussex coast forms a wide, shallow bay between the headlands of Selsey Bill and Beachy Head.

The Lanes form a retail, leisure and residential area located near the sea front and is charecterised by narrow alleyways following the street pattern of the original fishing village. The Lanes contains mainly clothing shops, jewelers, restaurants and pubs. Brighton's main retail centre is the Churchill Square shopping centre which has over 80 shops, restaurants and parking for 1,600 cars.

Brighton has many important landmarks including The Royal Pavilion which is a former royal palace which was built as a home for the Prince Regent during the early 19th century. The construction of the palace was undertaken under the direction of architect John Nash. Other notable landmarks include Brighton Marine Palace and Pier (known as the Palace Pier) which opened in 1899. It contains a funfair, restaurants and arcade halls. The West Pier was built in 1866 and is one of only two Grade I listed piers in the UK but is closed to the public since 1975.

About Cardiff

Cardiff is bordered to the west by the rural district of the Vale of Glamorgan—also known as The Garden of Cardiff— to the east by the city of Newport, to the north by the South Wales Valleys and to the south by the Severn Estuary and Bristol Channel. The River Taff winds through the centre of the city and together with the River Ely flows into the freshwater lake of Cardiff Bay. A third river, the Rhymney flows through the east of the city entering directly into the Severn Estuary. Its location and geographic features were influential in its development as the world's largest coal port, most notably its proximity and easy access to the coal fields of the south Wales valleys.

Today, Cardiff is the main financial and business centre in Wales and the city was recently placed seventh overall in the top 50 European cities and also ranked seventh in attracting foreign investment. Cardiff is one of the most popular tourist destination cities in the United Kingdom, receiving around 18 million visitors in 2010 and generating £852 million for the city's economy. There are a large number of hotels of varying sizes and standards in the city, providing almost 9,000 available bed spaces.