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Bristol Plymouth Train

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We offer the cheapest train tickets from Bristol to Plymouth as well as open/flexible return tickets, so get the best fare for by booking in advance with directrail.com now!

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About Bristol

Bristol is a city located in the south west of England and is the UK's 8th most populous city. The city borders the counties of Somerset and Gloucestershire and is close to the historic spa city of Bath to the south and Gloucester to the north. The city has been built around the River Avon and has a short coastline on the Severn Estuary which flows into the Bristol Channel.

Bristol has a long maritime history of trading commodities, originally wool cloth exports and imports of fish, wine, grain and dairy produce, later tobacco, tropical fruits and plantation goods; major imports now are motor vehicles, grain, timber, fresh produce and petroleum products. The port was originally in the city centre but was moved to the Severn Estuary at Avonmouth. The site of the former dock in the city centre has been redeveloped and now attracts visitors to its bars, restaurants and cultural venues.

Bristol is home to two major universities: the University of Bristol, a "redbrick" university chartered in 1909, and the University of the West of England, formerly Bristol Polytechnic, which gained university status in 1992. The University of Law also has a campus in the city.

The city has two main line railway stations: Bristol Temple Meads and Bristol Parkway which is located to the north of the city.

About Plymouth

The city of Plymouth lies between the River Plym and the River Tamar in the south west of England. Both rivers flow into Plymouth Sound, a natural harbour. Plymouth Sound is protected from the sea by the Plymouth Breakwater, which has been in use since 1814. In the Sound is Drake's Island which is seen from Plymouth Hoe, a flat public area on top of limestone cliffs. The River Tamar forms the county boundary between Devon and Cornwall and its estuary upon which Devonport Dockyard sits.

Due to its position on the coast, Plymouth has historically had a maritime based economy particular in the defence sector. Devonport Dockyard is the United Kingdom's only naval base that refits nuclear submarines. Plymouth also has the largest grouping of maritime businesses in the south west of England. The city also has the Plymouth Gin Distillery which has been producing Plymouth Gin since 1793.

Built in 1815, Union Street was at the heart of Plymouth's historical culture. It became known as the servicemen's playground, as it was where sailors from the Royal Navy would seek entertainment of all kinds. During the 1930s, there were 30 pubs and it attracted such performers as Charlie Chaplin to the New Palace Theatre. It is now the late-night hub of Plymouth's entertainment strip.