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About Canterbury

The historic city of Canterbury is located in south east England in the county of Kent and lies on the River Stour. The city's cathedral, which lies at the heart of the city, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Canterbury Cathedral was founded in 597 AD by Augustine and is the Mother Church of the Anglican Communion and the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the head of the Anglican Church. Many historical structures remain, including a city wall founded in Roman times and rebuilt in the 14th century, the ruins of St Augustine's Abbey and a Norman castle, and perhaps the oldest school in England, The King's School.

The city's theatre and concert hall is the Marlowe Theatre which was named after Christopher Marlowe, who was born in the city in Elizabethan times. The old Marlowe Theatre was located in St Margaret's Street and housed a repertory theatre. The Gulbenkian Theatre, at the University of Kent, also serves the city, housing also a cinema and café. The Marlowe Theatre has now been completely rebuilt, fully opening in October 2011. Besides the two theatres, theatrical performances also take place at several areas of the city, for instance the Cathedral and St Augustine's Abbey. The premiere of Murder in the Cathedral by T. S. Eliot took place at Canterbury Cathedral.

The city is served by two main line railway stations: Canterbury West and Canterbury East.

About London

London has too many buildings to be characterised by one architectural style. This is due, in part, to the varying ages of its buildings with dating back as far as the 11th century, such as The Tower of London. Many of London's large, opulent, houses and public buildings, such as the National Gallery, were constructed using Portland stone. However, different parts of the city have styles of their own. For example, the area to the west of central London is characterised by white stucco buildings. Although some do exist, few of London's surviving buildings pre-date the Great Fire of 1666. Those that do may have a trace of Roman remains or are of Tudor origins.

London is also a very green city with many parks and open spaces for inhabitants and visitors to enjoy. In central London there are a number of Royal Parks: Hyde Park and its neighbour Kensington Gardens, Regent's Park which is home to London Zoo, Green Park and St James's Park. Further out from the centre there is Greenwich Park, Bushey Park, Richmond Park and Victoria Park. Primrose Hill and Hampstead Heath to the north of Regent's Park are popular spots to view the ever changing London skyline.