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Canterbury Southampton Train

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About Canterbury

The historic city of Canterbury is located in south east England in the county of Kent and lies on the River Stour. The city's cathedral, which lies at the heart of the city, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Canterbury Cathedral was founded in 597 AD by Augustine and is the Mother Church of the Anglican Communion and the seat of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the head of the Anglican Church. Many historical structures remain, including a city wall founded in Roman times and rebuilt in the 14th century, the ruins of St Augustine's Abbey and a Norman castle, and perhaps the oldest school in England, The King's School.

The city's theatre and concert hall is the Marlowe Theatre which was named after Christopher Marlowe, who was born in the city in Elizabethan times. The old Marlowe Theatre was located in St Margaret's Street and housed a repertory theatre. The Gulbenkian Theatre, at the University of Kent, also serves the city, housing also a cinema and café. The Marlowe Theatre has now been completely rebuilt, fully opening in October 2011. Besides the two theatres, theatrical performances also take place at several areas of the city, for instance the Cathedral and St Augustine's Abbey. The premiere of Murder in the Cathedral by T. S. Eliot took place at Canterbury Cathedral.

The city is served by two main line railway stations: Canterbury West and Canterbury East.

About Southampton

The city of Southampton has always been influenced by the sea. The Hampshire city lies at the northern tip of Southampton Water which is a deep water estuary where the rivers Test and Itchen meet. Southampton city centre lies in between the two rivers. The Town Quay is the city's original public quay which can date its origins back to the 13th century. The Eastern Docks in the city were created in the 1830's by reclaiming mud flats between the rivers Itchen and Test estuaries. The Western Docks were created in the 1930's when the Southern Railway Company commissioned a major land reclamation and dredging programme.

One of the main advantages of Southampton Water is that it has a double high tide which makes the movement of large ships much easier. This is not caused as popularly supposed by the presence of the Isle of Wight, but is a function of the shape and depth of the English Channel. The double high tide is perhaps one of the reasons why Southampton Water hosts many of the world's largest and luxurious cruise ships.

Southampton is home to Southampton Football Club, sometimes referred to as "The Saints", who play in the Premier League at St Mary's Stadium, having relocated in 2001 from their 103-year-old former stadium, "The Dell".