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Chester Cambridge Train

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About Chester

The city of Chester lies on the River Dee and is located in the county of Cheshire in north west England and is close to the border with Wales. Chester was granted city status in 1541. Chester was one of the last towns in England to fall to the Normans in the Norman conquest of England. William the Conqueror ordered the construction of a castle, to dominate the town and the nearby Welsh border. The city has a number of medieval buildings, but some of the black-and-white buildings within the city centre are actually Victorian restorations. Chester is one of the best preserved walled cities in Britain and apart from a 100-metre section, the listed Grade I walls are almost complete. A footpath runs along the top of the walls, crossing roads by bridges over Eastgate, Northgate, St Martin's Gate, Watergate, Bridgegate, Newgate, and the Wolf Gate, and passing a series of structures, namely Phoenix Tower (or King Charles' Tower), Morgan's Mount, the Goblin Tower (or Pemberton's Parlour), and Bonewaldesthorne's Tower with a spur leading to the Water Tower, and Thimbleby's Tower.

The Industrial Revolution brought railways, canals, and new roads to the city, which saw substantial expansion and development – Chester Town Hall and the Grosvenor Museum are examples of Victorian architecture from this period.

About Cambridge

Cambridge is located about 50 miles to the north east of London and lies in an area of level and relatively low lying terrain to the south of the Fens, which is a naturally marshy area in Eastern England which are between 6 and 24 meters above sea level. These wetlands originally surrounded Cambridge but were drained as Cambridge expanded. The city lies on the banks of the River Cam and is also bordered by water meadow such as Sheep's Green. The city takes its name from the River Cam.

The city's principle theatre is the Arts Centre which has 666 seats and is located in the city centre. The theatre often puts on touring shows along with productions by local theatre companies. The largest venue in the city is the Cambridge Corn Exchange which has a capacity of 1,800 standing or 1,200 seated. The venue is regularly hosts theatre, dance and music performances. Cambridge's newest theatre is the 220 seat J2, which is part of Cambridge Junction. The ADC Theatre is managed by the University of Cambridge, and typically has 3 shows a week during term time. It hosts the Cambridge University Footlights Dramatic Club which has produced many notable figures in British comedy.