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Chester Edinburgh Train

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About Chester

The city of Chester lies on the River Dee and is located in the county of Cheshire in north west England and is close to the border with Wales. Chester was granted city status in 1541. Chester was one of the last towns in England to fall to the Normans in the Norman conquest of England. William the Conqueror ordered the construction of a castle, to dominate the town and the nearby Welsh border. The city has a number of medieval buildings, but some of the black-and-white buildings within the city centre are actually Victorian restorations. Chester is one of the best preserved walled cities in Britain and apart from a 100-metre section, the listed Grade I walls are almost complete. A footpath runs along the top of the walls, crossing roads by bridges over Eastgate, Northgate, St Martin's Gate, Watergate, Bridgegate, Newgate, and the Wolf Gate, and passing a series of structures, namely Phoenix Tower (or King Charles' Tower), Morgan's Mount, the Goblin Tower (or Pemberton's Parlour), and Bonewaldesthorne's Tower with a spur leading to the Water Tower, and Thimbleby's Tower.

The Industrial Revolution brought railways, canals, and new roads to the city, which saw substantial expansion and development – Chester Town Hall and the Grosvenor Museum are examples of Victorian architecture from this period.

About Edinburgh

The city of Edinburgh in Scotland has a rich history which has resulted in the city having many historic buildings. Examples include Edinburgh Castle, Holyrood Palace, the churches of St Giles, Greyfriars and the Canongate. Edinburgh also has an international reputation as a centre of learning particularly in medicine, science and engineering. The University of Edinburgh, which was founded in 1583, was recently placed 17th in the QS World University Rankings 2013, and is one of four universities in the city.

The city is also famous for the Edinburgh International Festival, which, since its inception in 1947, has grown – largely as a result of the "Fringe" and other associated events – into the biggest annual international arts festival in the world. The Festival is usually held over three weeks from the middle of August and brings top class performers of music (especially classical music), theatre, opera and dance from around the world to perform. The festival also hosts a series of visual art exhibitions, talks and workshops. However, the main festival has been overtaken in size and popularity by the Edinburgh Fringe which initially began as a range of alternative acts alongside the 'official' Festival and has progressed to become the largest performing arts festival in th world.