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Coventry Edinburgh Train

Find the information you need to book a train ticket on the Coventry to Edinburgh line between England and Scotland here. offer cheap train tickets with all UK train companies to and from all National Rail stations, not just in cities, but towns and villages too.

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About Coventry

The city of Coventry's Cathedral is perhaps one of the city's most famous landmarks. It is one of the newest cathedrals in the United Kingdom having been built in 1962. The construction was necessary following the destruction of the previous 14th century cathedral of Saint Michael by the German Luftwaffe in 1940 during the Second World War.

Coventry is located roughly 100 miles to the north west of London, 20 miles to the south east of Birmingham and 25 miles to the south west of Leicester. The city is home to the University of Warwick which is a short distance from the city centre, and Coventry University which is located in the city centre.

During the early 19th century the city was well-known due to author George Eliot (whose real name was Mary Ann Evans) who was born near Nuneaton. The city was the model for her famous novel Middlemarch. Coventry is also home to poet Philip Larkin who was born and brought up in the city. In more recent times Coventry is recognised for its range of music events including one of the UK's foremost international jazz programmes, the Coventry Jazz Festival, and the award-winning Godiva Festival.

About Edinburgh

Located in the Central Belt region of Scotland, the city of Edinburgh is Scotland's capital city, and has been recognised as such since the 15th century. Overlooked by its imposing castle, the symbol of the city, Edinburgh combines medieval relics, Georgian grandeur and a powerful layer of modern life with contemporary avant-garde. Medieval palaces rub shoulders with the best of modern architecture, Gothic churches with amazing museums and galleries. Scotland's throbbing night-life centre, Edinburgh, "the Athens of the North", is also a feast for the mind and the senses, playing host to great restaurants, shops and an unequaled programme of city festivals throughout the year. Hogmanay, the Scottish New Year, kicks off the festivities, which culminate in the high summer with the Tattoo, the International and the Fringe, amongst many others.

The Old and New Towns of Edinburgh were listed as World Heritage Sites by UNESCO in 1995. In 2004, Edinburgh became the first member of the UNESCO Creative Cities initiative when it was designated a City of Literature.

Edinburgh's historic centre is bisected by Princes Street Gardens, a broad swathe of parkland in the heart of the city. To the south of the gardens is the castle, located on top of an extinct volcanic crag, and flanked by the medieval streets of the Old Town following the Royal Mile along the ridge to the east.