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Glasgow Leeds Train

If you’re looking for trains between Scotland and England then you’re in the right place!

If you want to take the train from Glasgow to Leeds then book a ticket to take you from Glasgow Central travelling to Leeds.

At direct rail we’re completely impartial and our aim is to help you find the best fare for your Glasgow to Leeds rail journey, quickly, securely and hassle free.

Fare types can sometimes come across a bit confusing but fear not, we make it simple for you to view the best ticket type for the journey between Glasgow and Leeds.

Your Glasgow to Leeds train ticket is just a few clicks away! Enter your details into our search box and hit the get train times and tickets button.

About Glasgow

Glasgow is the largest city in Scotland and lies on the River Clyde in the West Central Lowlands of Scotland. Glasgow grew from a riverside, rural settlement to one of the largest seaports in the United Kingdom. From the 18th century the city prospered as one of the United Kingdom's main centres of transatlantic trade with North America and the West Indies.

The city centre is bounded by the High Street to the east, the River Clyde to the south and the M8 motorway to the west and north which was built through the Townhead, Charing Cross, Cowcaddens and Anderston areas in the 1960s. The centre is based on a grid system of streets and at the heart of the city centre lies George Square, site of many of Glasgow's public statues and home to Glasgow City Council. The principle shopping areas in Glasgow are Buchanan Galleries and the St. Enoch Centre. Princes Square and the Italian Centre are the places to go if you are seeking designer labels.

Glasgow has a rich sporting heritage and is home to two of Scotland's largest football clubs: Glasgow Celtic and Glasgow Rangers - sometimes referred to as the "Old Firm".

About Leeds

The West Yorkshire city of Leeds can trace its origins back to the Middle Ages where it developed as a market town. Prior to the onset of the Industrial Revolution, Leeds became a coordination centre for the manufacture of woollen cloth and white broadcloth was traded at its White Cloth Hall. In 1770, the city was responsible for one sixth of the export trade of cloth. The construction of the Aire and Calder Navigation in 1699 and the Leeds and Liverpool Canal in 1816 spurred on the growth of textiles in Leeds. The next stage of the city's development came with the arrival of the railway network in the 1830's which connected Leeds to markets throughout the north of England and beyond. Specifically it connected Leeds to Manchester and the ports of Liverpool and Hull which improved access to international markets.

Leeds railway station offers passengers services to the suburbs of Leeds and beyond to the rest of the country. It is one of the busiest stations on the national rail network outside London. It also has the largest number of platforms of any railway station in the United Kingdom outside London.

Leeds Bradford Airport also provides passengers with many daily flights to destinations in the United Kingdom, Europe, Egypt, Tunisia, Pakistan and the USA.