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Glasgow London Train

Thinking about travelling by train from Scotland to England between Glasgow and London?

The Glasgow London train connection train travels between the stations of Glasgow Central and London Euston as well as from Glasgow Central station to London Kings Cross.

At direct rail you’ll find all UK train services with all of the train operators featured on the national rail network which means you are almost certain to find the ideal ticket on the line from Glasgow to London.

Fare types can sometimes come across a bit confusing but fear not, we make it simple for you to view the best ticket type for the journey between Glasgow and London.

Your Glasgow to London train ticket is just a few clicks away! Enter your details into our search box and hit the get train times and tickets button.

About Glasgow

Glasgow is the largest city in Scotland and lies on the River Clyde in the West Central Lowlands of Scotland. Glasgow grew from a riverside, rural settlement to one of the largest seaports in the United Kingdom. From the 18th century the city prospered as one of the United Kingdom's main centres of transatlantic trade with North America and the West Indies.

The city centre is bounded by the High Street to the east, the River Clyde to the south and the M8 motorway to the west and north which was built through the Townhead, Charing Cross, Cowcaddens and Anderston areas in the 1960s. The centre is based on a grid system of streets and at the heart of the city centre lies George Square, site of many of Glasgow's public statues and home to Glasgow City Council. The principle shopping areas in Glasgow are Buchanan Galleries and the St. Enoch Centre. Princes Square and the Italian Centre are the places to go if you are seeking designer labels.

Glasgow has a rich sporting heritage and is home to two of Scotland's largest football clubs: Glasgow Celtic and Glasgow Rangers - sometimes referred to as the "Old Firm".

About London

London has too many buildings to be characterised by one architectural style. This is due, in part, to the varying ages of its buildings with dating back as far as the 11th century, such as The Tower of London. Many of London's large, opulent, houses and public buildings, such as the National Gallery, were constructed using Portland stone. However, different parts of the city have styles of their own. For example, the area to the west of central London is characterised by white stucco buildings. Although some do exist, few of London's surviving buildings pre-date the Great Fire of 1666. Those that do may have a trace of Roman remains or are of Tudor origins.

London is also a very green city with many parks and open spaces for inhabitants and visitors to enjoy. In central London there are a number of Royal Parks: Hyde Park and its neighbour Kensington Gardens, Regent's Park which is home to London Zoo, Green Park and St James's Park. Further out from the centre there is Greenwich Park, Bushey Park, Richmond Park and Victoria Park. Primrose Hill and Hampstead Heath to the north of Regent's Park are popular spots to view the ever changing London skyline.