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Glasgow Oxford Train

Thinking about travelling by train from Scotland to England between Glasgow and Oxford?

Directrail.com offer cheap train tickets with all UK train companies to and from all National Rail stations, not just in cities, but towns and villages too.

Fare types can sometimes come across a bit confusing but fear not, we make it simple for you to view the best ticket type for the journey between Glasgow and Oxford.

To book your train ticket, simply start typing your departure and destination stations into the ticket search box and follow the prompts.

About Glasgow

Glasgow is the largest city in Scotland and lies on the River Clyde in the West Central Lowlands of Scotland. Glasgow grew from a riverside, rural settlement to one of the largest seaports in the United Kingdom. From the 18th century the city prospered as one of the United Kingdom's main centres of transatlantic trade with North America and the West Indies.

The city centre is bounded by the High Street to the east, the River Clyde to the south and the M8 motorway to the west and north which was built through the Townhead, Charing Cross, Cowcaddens and Anderston areas in the 1960s. The centre is based on a grid system of streets and at the heart of the city centre lies George Square, site of many of Glasgow's public statues and home to Glasgow City Council. The principle shopping areas in Glasgow are Buchanan Galleries and the St. Enoch Centre. Princes Square and the Italian Centre are the places to go if you are seeking designer labels.

Glasgow has a rich sporting heritage and is home to two of Scotland's largest football clubs: Glasgow Celtic and Glasgow Rangers - sometimes referred to as the "Old Firm".

About Oxford

The historic university city of Oxford is located in the county of Oxfordshire and is roughly 35 miles to the east of Cheltenham and 30 miles to the south west of Milton Keynes. Although known for its university the economy of Oxford is also reliant on car making, publishing, science and technology, bellfounding and brewing. Several of the University's colleges had private breweries which includes Brasenose College whose brewery survived until 1889.

Oxford used to be an important port of the River Thames, although the section of the Thames that runs through Oxford is called The Isis. To accommodate commercial traffic the Oxford-Burcot Commission in the 17th century took steps to improve the navigability of the river. The Oxford Canal was constructed in the 18th century in order to connect Oxford with the Midlands. Commercial traffic has given way to recreational use of the river and canal. Oxford was the original base of Salters Steamers and there is a regular service from Folly Bridge downstream to Abingdon and beyond.

Interesting attractions in the city include the Ashmolean Museum, the Bodleian Library, Christ Church Cathedral, The Headington Shark, the Museum of History and Science and the Oxford University Museum of Natural History.