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Gloucester London Train

Gloucester London trains depart from Gloucester station and arrive at London Paddington.

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About Gloucester

The cathedral city of Gloucester is the county town of Gloucestershire and lies very close to the border with Wales. The city is roughly 30 miles to the north east of Bristol and 45 miles to the south west of Birmingham. Gloucester lies on the banks of the River Severn and is bounded by the Cotswolds to the east, the Forest of Dean to the west and the Malvern Hills to the north. Interestingly Gloucester is also a port city being linked to the Severn Estuary by the Gloucester and Sharpness Canal. Following renovation the city's former wharfs and warehouses form a public open space, are home to the National Waterways Museum and a number of apartments, shops and bars.

Gloucester Cathedral is in the north of the city close to the river and originates in the foundation of an abbey dedicated to St Peter in 681. The cathedral is the burial place of King Edward II and its cloisters were used for some scenes in some of the Harry Potter movies.

Gloucester's main theatre is the Guildhall which hosts a large and diverse number of entertainments including live music, dance sessions, a cinema, bar, cafe and art gallery.

About London

London has too many buildings to be characterised by one architectural style. This is due, in part, to the varying ages of its buildings with dating back as far as the 11th century, such as The Tower of London. Many of London's large, opulent, houses and public buildings, such as the National Gallery, were constructed using Portland stone. However, different parts of the city have styles of their own. For example, the area to the west of central London is characterised by white stucco buildings. Although some do exist, few of London's surviving buildings pre-date the Great Fire of 1666. Those that do may have a trace of Roman remains or are of Tudor origins.

London is also a very green city with many parks and open spaces for inhabitants and visitors to enjoy. In central London there are a number of Royal Parks: Hyde Park and its neighbour Kensington Gardens, Regent's Park which is home to London Zoo, Green Park and St James's Park. Further out from the centre there is Greenwich Park, Bushey Park, Richmond Park and Victoria Park. Primrose Hill and Hampstead Heath to the north of Regent's Park are popular spots to view the ever changing London skyline.