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Gloucester Plymouth Train

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About Gloucester

The cathedral city of Gloucester is the county town of Gloucestershire and lies very close to the border with Wales. The city is roughly 30 miles to the north east of Bristol and 45 miles to the south west of Birmingham. Gloucester lies on the banks of the River Severn and is bounded by the Cotswolds to the east, the Forest of Dean to the west and the Malvern Hills to the north. Interestingly Gloucester is also a port city being linked to the Severn Estuary by the Gloucester and Sharpness Canal. Following renovation the city's former wharfs and warehouses form a public open space, are home to the National Waterways Museum and a number of apartments, shops and bars.

Gloucester Cathedral is in the north of the city close to the river and originates in the foundation of an abbey dedicated to St Peter in 681. The cathedral is the burial place of King Edward II and its cloisters were used for some scenes in some of the Harry Potter movies.

Gloucester's main theatre is the Guildhall which hosts a large and diverse number of entertainments including live music, dance sessions, a cinema, bar, cafe and art gallery.

About Plymouth

The city of Plymouth lies between the River Plym and the River Tamar in the south west of England. Both rivers flow into Plymouth Sound, a natural harbour. Plymouth Sound is protected from the sea by the Plymouth Breakwater, which has been in use since 1814. In the Sound is Drake's Island which is seen from Plymouth Hoe, a flat public area on top of limestone cliffs. The River Tamar forms the county boundary between Devon and Cornwall and its estuary upon which Devonport Dockyard sits.

Due to its position on the coast, Plymouth has historically had a maritime based economy particular in the defence sector. Devonport Dockyard is the United Kingdom's only naval base that refits nuclear submarines. Plymouth also has the largest grouping of maritime businesses in the south west of England. The city also has the Plymouth Gin Distillery which has been producing Plymouth Gin since 1793.

Built in 1815, Union Street was at the heart of Plymouth's historical culture. It became known as the servicemen's playground, as it was where sailors from the Royal Navy would seek entertainment of all kinds. During the 1930s, there were 30 pubs and it attracted such performers as Charlie Chaplin to the New Palace Theatre. It is now the late-night hub of Plymouth's entertainment strip.