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Hereford Leeds Train

At direct rail you’ll find all UK train services with all of the train operators featured on the national rail network which means you are almost certain to find the ideal ticket on the line from Hereford to Leeds.

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On many routes you can save on average 43% by buying your ticket in advance in comparison to buying at your local station on the day of travel. So what are you waiting for? Search for your train fares from Hereford to Leeds now.

About Hereford

The cathedral city of Hereford is the county town of Herefordshire, England. The city lies on the River Wye and is roughly 15 miles from the border with Wales and 25 miles to the south west of Worcester. The city has its origins in Anglo-Saxon times where and army or group of soldiers "here" used the place to cross the river "ford". In Welsh, Hereford, means "old road" and refers to the Roman road and settlement at nearby Stretton Sugwas.

Today, Hereford is known as a trading centre for the areas rural areas around the city. This trade centres around the city's cattle market. The city is known for a number of products including cider, beer, leather goods, poultry, chemicals and cattle, including the famous Hereford breed.

Visitors to Hereford can take in the splendour of The Old House which is an historic black and white house in the centre of High Town which is a museum about life in the Jacobean era of the 1600's when the house was built. The Hereford Museum and Art gallery which is located in a Victorian Gothic building contains many artifacts, fine art and decorative art associated with the city and surrounding area.

About Leeds

The West Yorkshire city of Leeds can trace its origins back to the Middle Ages where it developed as a market town. Prior to the onset of the Industrial Revolution, Leeds became a coordination centre for the manufacture of woollen cloth and white broadcloth was traded at its White Cloth Hall. In 1770, the city was responsible for one sixth of the export trade of cloth. The construction of the Aire and Calder Navigation in 1699 and the Leeds and Liverpool Canal in 1816 spurred on the growth of textiles in Leeds. The next stage of the city's development came with the arrival of the railway network in the 1830's which connected Leeds to markets throughout the north of England and beyond. Specifically it connected Leeds to Manchester and the ports of Liverpool and Hull which improved access to international markets.

Leeds railway station offers passengers services to the suburbs of Leeds and beyond to the rest of the country. It is one of the busiest stations on the national rail network outside London. It also has the largest number of platforms of any railway station in the United Kingdom outside London.

Leeds Bradford Airport also provides passengers with many daily flights to destinations in the United Kingdom, Europe, Egypt, Tunisia, Pakistan and the USA.