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Hereford London Train

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About Hereford

The cathedral city of Hereford is the county town of Herefordshire, England. The city lies on the River Wye and is roughly 15 miles from the border with Wales and 25 miles to the south west of Worcester. The city has its origins in Anglo-Saxon times where and army or group of soldiers "here" used the place to cross the river "ford". In Welsh, Hereford, means "old road" and refers to the Roman road and settlement at nearby Stretton Sugwas.

Today, Hereford is known as a trading centre for the areas rural areas around the city. This trade centres around the city's cattle market. The city is known for a number of products including cider, beer, leather goods, poultry, chemicals and cattle, including the famous Hereford breed.

Visitors to Hereford can take in the splendour of The Old House which is an historic black and white house in the centre of High Town which is a museum about life in the Jacobean era of the 1600's when the house was built. The Hereford Museum and Art gallery which is located in a Victorian Gothic building contains many artifacts, fine art and decorative art associated with the city and surrounding area.

About London

London has too many buildings to be characterised by one architectural style. This is due, in part, to the varying ages of its buildings with dating back as far as the 11th century, such as The Tower of London. Many of London's large, opulent, houses and public buildings, such as the National Gallery, were constructed using Portland stone. However, different parts of the city have styles of their own. For example, the area to the west of central London is characterised by white stucco buildings. Although some do exist, few of London's surviving buildings pre-date the Great Fire of 1666. Those that do may have a trace of Roman remains or are of Tudor origins.

London is also a very green city with many parks and open spaces for inhabitants and visitors to enjoy. In central London there are a number of Royal Parks: Hyde Park and its neighbour Kensington Gardens, Regent's Park which is home to London Zoo, Green Park and St James's Park. Further out from the centre there is Greenwich Park, Bushey Park, Richmond Park and Victoria Park. Primrose Hill and Hampstead Heath to the north of Regent's Park are popular spots to view the ever changing London skyline.