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Hereford Plymouth Train

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About Hereford

The cathedral city of Hereford is the county town of Herefordshire, England. The city lies on the River Wye and is roughly 15 miles from the border with Wales and 25 miles to the south west of Worcester. The city has its origins in Anglo-Saxon times where and army or group of soldiers "here" used the place to cross the river "ford". In Welsh, Hereford, means "old road" and refers to the Roman road and settlement at nearby Stretton Sugwas.

Today, Hereford is known as a trading centre for the areas rural areas around the city. This trade centres around the city's cattle market. The city is known for a number of products including cider, beer, leather goods, poultry, chemicals and cattle, including the famous Hereford breed.

Visitors to Hereford can take in the splendour of The Old House which is an historic black and white house in the centre of High Town which is a museum about life in the Jacobean era of the 1600's when the house was built. The Hereford Museum and Art gallery which is located in a Victorian Gothic building contains many artifacts, fine art and decorative art associated with the city and surrounding area.

About Plymouth

The city of Plymouth lies between the River Plym and the River Tamar in the south west of England. Both rivers flow into Plymouth Sound, a natural harbour. Plymouth Sound is protected from the sea by the Plymouth Breakwater, which has been in use since 1814. In the Sound is Drake's Island which is seen from Plymouth Hoe, a flat public area on top of limestone cliffs. The River Tamar forms the county boundary between Devon and Cornwall and its estuary upon which Devonport Dockyard sits.

Due to its position on the coast, Plymouth has historically had a maritime based economy particular in the defence sector. Devonport Dockyard is the United Kingdom's only naval base that refits nuclear submarines. Plymouth also has the largest grouping of maritime businesses in the south west of England. The city also has the Plymouth Gin Distillery which has been producing Plymouth Gin since 1793.

Built in 1815, Union Street was at the heart of Plymouth's historical culture. It became known as the servicemen's playground, as it was where sailors from the Royal Navy would seek entertainment of all kinds. During the 1930s, there were 30 pubs and it attracted such performers as Charlie Chaplin to the New Palace Theatre. It is now the late-night hub of Plymouth's entertainment strip.