Direct Rail
Book In Advance
Travel from Lincoln to London by train
Get The Best Deals
Book in advance and save £’s versus standard walk on fares

Lincoln London Train

Use the direct rail train times and ticket search box to get all the information you need on trains from Lincoln to London including schedules, all available fare types from anytime peak to super-off peak.

Fare types can sometimes come across a bit confusing but fear not, we make it simple for you to view the best ticket type for the journey between Lincoln and London.

To book your train ticket, simply start typing your departure and destination stations into the ticket search box and follow the prompts.

About Lincoln

The cathedral city of Lincoln is located in, and the county town of, Lincolnshire in England. The city lies in a gap in the Lincoln Cliff by the River Witham roughly 150 miles to the north of London. The city's origins date back to Roman times which developed from the Roman time of Lindum Colonia. Perhaps the city's most famous landmarks are its cathedral and its 11th century castle.

Following destruction of the first cathedral by an earthquake, construction on the current cathedral began in 1185 and when completed it was widely recognised as being the tallest man made structure in the world, surpassing the Great Pyramids of Egypt. Contained within the cathedral is one of only 4 surviving original copies of the Magna Carta which was drawn up in 1215.

Other visitor attractions in the city include the Museum of Lincolnshire Life and the Sir Joseph Banks Conservatory at the Lawn, which is adjacent to Lincoln Castle. If visitors require a more tranquil experience then the Whisby Nature Reserve and the Hartsholme Country Park, which includes the Swanholme Lakes Local Nature Reserve, are places to head to. A louder experience would be to head to RAF Scampton which is home to the Red Arrows jet aerobatic team.

About London

London has too many buildings to be characterised by one architectural style. This is due, in part, to the varying ages of its buildings with dating back as far as the 11th century, such as The Tower of London. Many of London's large, opulent, houses and public buildings, such as the National Gallery, were constructed using Portland stone. However, different parts of the city have styles of their own. For example, the area to the west of central London is characterised by white stucco buildings. Although some do exist, few of London's surviving buildings pre-date the Great Fire of 1666. Those that do may have a trace of Roman remains or are of Tudor origins.

London is also a very green city with many parks and open spaces for inhabitants and visitors to enjoy. In central London there are a number of Royal Parks: Hyde Park and its neighbour Kensington Gardens, Regent's Park which is home to London Zoo, Green Park and St James's Park. Further out from the centre there is Greenwich Park, Bushey Park, Richmond Park and Victoria Park. Primrose Hill and Hampstead Heath to the north of Regent's Park are popular spots to view the ever changing London skyline.