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London Plymouth Train

London Plymouth trains depart from London Paddington station and arrive at Plymouth.

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About London

London is the capital city of both England and of the United Kingdom and spans both banks of the River Thames. Present day London can trace its history back 2,000 years from when it was a Roman settlement. London is a truly global city that has strengths in arts, commerce, education, entertainment, fashion, finance, media, research and development and tourism. London has the largest financial services sector in the world, the world's largest city airport by passenger numbers and world class universities including Imperial College, King's College the London School of Economics and University College London.

Due in part to its port London has a diverse population from around the world. It is estimated that more than 300 languages are spoken within the city's boundaries. This ethnic diversity enhances London's cultural offering. Among the many landmarks and historic buildings visitors are particularly drawn to the four sites that have been declared UNESCO World Heritage Sites: the Tower of London, Kew Gardens, the combined Palace of Westminster, Westminster Abbey and St. Margaret's Church and Greenwich which includes the Royal Observatory and the fact that Greenwich marks the Prime Meridian, 0 degrees longitude and Greenwich Mean Time (GMT).

About Plymouth

The city of Plymouth lies between the River Plym and the River Tamar in the south west of England. Both rivers flow into Plymouth Sound, a natural harbour. Plymouth Sound is protected from the sea by the Plymouth Breakwater, which has been in use since 1814. In the Sound is Drake's Island which is seen from Plymouth Hoe, a flat public area on top of limestone cliffs. The River Tamar forms the county boundary between Devon and Cornwall and its estuary upon which Devonport Dockyard sits.

Due to its position on the coast, Plymouth has historically had a maritime based economy particular in the defence sector. Devonport Dockyard is the United Kingdom's only naval base that refits nuclear submarines. Plymouth also has the largest grouping of maritime businesses in the south west of England. The city also has the Plymouth Gin Distillery which has been producing Plymouth Gin since 1793.

Built in 1815, Union Street was at the heart of Plymouth's historical culture. It became known as the servicemen's playground, as it was where sailors from the Royal Navy would seek entertainment of all kinds. During the 1930s, there were 30 pubs and it attracted such performers as Charlie Chaplin to the New Palace Theatre. It is now the late-night hub of Plymouth's entertainment strip.