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Manchester London Train

Manchester London trains depart from Manchester Piccadilly station and arrive at London Euston.

At direct rail we’re completely impartial and our aim is to help you find the best fare for your Manchester to London rail journey, quickly, securely and hassle free.

It’s never been easier to buy train tickets, not just between Manchester and London but to and from any station on the national rail network.

To book your train ticket, simply start typing your departure and destination stations into the ticket search box and follow the prompts.

About Manchester

Manchester is a city in the north west of England and is the sixth largest city in the United Kingdom. Manchester is surrounded by the Cheshire Plain to the south and the Pennines to the north and east. Manchester grew as a city as a result of the changes resulting from the boom in the textile industry spurred on by the Industrial Revolution. The city was the world's first industrialised city. To accommodate the increasing levels of trade the Bridgewater Canal was built in 1761 to transport coal. Manchester was also the site of the world's first railway station and is also where scientists first split the atom and developed the first stored program computer.

The city is notable for its architecture, culture, music, media, scientific and engineering output, sports clubs and transport connections. Two large squares contain many of the city's public monuments. Albert Square, outside Manchester Town Hall, has monuments to Prince Albert, Bishop James Fraser, Oliver Heywood, Ewart Gladstone and John Bright. Piccadilly Gardens has monuments to Queen Victoria, Robert Peel, James Watt and the Duke of Wellington.

The city is also home to two of the English Premier League's biggest football clubs: Manchester United Football Club, the most successful club in Premier League history, and Manchester City Football Club.

About London

London has too many buildings to be characterised by one architectural style. This is due, in part, to the varying ages of its buildings with dating back as far as the 11th century, such as The Tower of London. Many of London's large, opulent, houses and public buildings, such as the National Gallery, were constructed using Portland stone. However, different parts of the city have styles of their own. For example, the area to the west of central London is characterised by white stucco buildings. Although some do exist, few of London's surviving buildings pre-date the Great Fire of 1666. Those that do may have a trace of Roman remains or are of Tudor origins.

London is also a very green city with many parks and open spaces for inhabitants and visitors to enjoy. In central London there are a number of Royal Parks: Hyde Park and its neighbour Kensington Gardens, Regent's Park which is home to London Zoo, Green Park and St James's Park. Further out from the centre there is Greenwich Park, Bushey Park, Richmond Park and Victoria Park. Primrose Hill and Hampstead Heath to the north of Regent's Park are popular spots to view the ever changing London skyline.