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Newcastle Canterbury Train

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We offer the cheapest train tickets from Newcastle to Canterbury as well as open/flexible return tickets, so get the best fare for by booking in advance with directrail.com now!

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About Newcastle

Newcastle upon Tyne, often referred to as just Newcastle, is a city located in the metropolitan borough of Tyne and Wear in the north east of England. Newcastle lies on the north bank of the River Tyne and is roughly 9 miles from the North Sea coast. The development of the seaport in the 16th century contributed to Newcastle's growth along with the shipyards that were located lower down the river towards the coast. At one time Newcastle was amongst the world's largest ship building and ship repairing centres. Modern day Newcastle's economy includes hosting many corporate headquarters, education, digital technologies, retail, tourism and other cultural centres.

Newcastle is world famous for a number of iconic brands: Newcastle Brown Ale, a brand of beer, Newcastle United Football Club, a Premier League football team and the Tyne Bridge. It is also home to the most popular half marathon, the Great North Run.

Newcastle's thriving Chinatown lies in the north-west of Grainger Town, centered on Stowell Street. A new Chinese arch, or paifang, providing a landmark entrance, was handed over to the city with a ceremony in 2005.

The UK's first biotechnology village, the "Centre for Life" is located in the city centre close to Newcastle Central railway station. The village is the first step in the City Council's plans to transform Newcastle into a science city.

About Canterbury

Canterbury, in the south east of England, can trace its history back to before the Romans in the 1st century AD but grew in importance following the Kingdom of Kent's conversion to Christianity in 597 when St Augustine founded a bishops seat in the city and then became the first Archbishop of Canterbury, a position that now heads the Church of England and the worldwide Anglican Communion. Thomas Becket's murder at Canterbury Cathedral in 1170 led to the cathedral becoming a place of pilgrimage for Christians worldwide.

The city is on the River Stour or Great Stour, flowing from its source at Lenham north-east through Ashford to the English Channel at Sandwich. The river divides south east of the city, one branch flowing though the city, the other around the position of the former walls. The Stour is navigable on the tidal section to Fordwich, although above this point canoes and other small craft can be used. Punts and rowed river boats are available for hire in Canterbury.

Canterbury is home to many historic structures in addition to its cathedral. These include the city wall built in Roman times and rebuilt in the 14th century, the ruins of St Augustine Abbey and a Norman castle. The city is also home to perhaps the oldest school in England, The King's School.