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Newcastle Canterbury Train offer cheap train tickets with all UK train companies to and from all National Rail stations, not just in cities, but towns and villages too.

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About Newcastle

The north east city of Newcastle upon Tyne still retains its medieval street layout, and its narrow alleys are perhaps most prevalent around the riverside area of the city. Stairs from the riverside to higher parts of the city centre and the Castle Keep, which were originally recorded in the 14th century, still remain.

To the north west of the city centre is Leazes Park which was established in 1873 following a petition by local residents to have access to some open spaces for health and recreation. Just outside the park is St James' Park football stadium, home to Newcastle United Football Club. The stadium, which has a capacity of just over 52,000, dominates the view of the city from all directions. Another green space enjoyed by residents and visitors alike is Town Moor which is located to the north of the city centre. It is larger than London's Hyde Park and Hampstead Heath combined. In the south eastern corner of the city is Exhibition Park, which contains the only remaining pavilion from the North East Coast Exhibition of 1929. Since the 1970s this has housed the Newcastle Military Vehicle Museum although this is now closed.

About Canterbury

Located in the south east of England in the county of Kent, Canterbury is an historic city with its cathedral being the centre of the world wide Anglican Church. The cathedral, the oldest in England, dominates the city's skyline but there is more to Canterbury than its cathedral. The ancient ruins of St Augustine's Abbey and St martin's Church form Canterbury's UNESCO World Heritage Site. Canterbury is a small city and is best explored on foot. Walking trails or guided walks will help you make the most of your time here and to enjoy the winding lanes and streets, all with their own unique identity. Alternatively you may wish to relax and absorb the wonder of the city with a boat trip along the River Stour where will be able to appreciate Canterbury's finest and historical architecture set against outstanding, scenic views. The crystal clear waters of the Stour offer a home to ducks, swans, fish and other wildlife while the river banks have an array of bending willow trees and wild flowers. North of the city is the award winning Crab and Winkle Way which is mostly a traffic free, seven mile cycling and walking route based on an old railway line running between Canterbury and Whitstable. It's safe for children and provides a perfect place to picnic along the way in the heart of one of England's oldest forests.