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About Newcastle

The north east city of Newcastle upon Tyne still retains its medieval street layout, and its narrow alleys are perhaps most prevalent around the riverside area of the city. Stairs from the riverside to higher parts of the city centre and the Castle Keep, which were originally recorded in the 14th century, still remain.

To the north west of the city centre is Leazes Park which was established in 1873 following a petition by local residents to have access to some open spaces for health and recreation. Just outside the park is St James' Park football stadium, home to Newcastle United Football Club. The stadium, which has a capacity of just over 52,000, dominates the view of the city from all directions. Another green space enjoyed by residents and visitors alike is Town Moor which is located to the north of the city centre. It is larger than London's Hyde Park and Hampstead Heath combined. In the south eastern corner of the city is Exhibition Park, which contains the only remaining pavilion from the North East Coast Exhibition of 1929. Since the 1970s this has housed the Newcastle Military Vehicle Museum although this is now closed.

About Plymouth

Located in the county of Devon, the city of Plymouth is located between the mouths of two rivers and is widely regarded as one of the world's most impressive natural harbours. In 1588, the English Navy, which was led in part by Sir Francis Drake, set sail from Plymouth to defeat the Spanish Armada. Plymouth is by turns rugged and hilly, or green and rolling. Nearby Dartmoor was designated a National Park in 1951. Popular sites include Smeatons Tower a lighthouse re-sited on the Hoe, Mount Batten Peninsula, the National Marine Aquarium, and Buckland Abbey, which was Drake's former home.

The Royal Dockyard was built in the area, on the banks of the River Tamar, in 1690. It was in 1620 that the Pilgrim Fathers finally left Plymouth after repairs on their escape from religious persecution to the New World, eventually setting up Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts.

Plymouth is quite a small city and the waterfront area, the Barbican and the Hoe, are within walking range from the centre of the city. Water taxis are available, normally during the summer months, to take visitors to various destinations around the waterside part of the city. The rest of the city is well covered by local bus services.