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Newcastle Plymouth Train

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About Newcastle

Newcastle upon Tyne, often referred to as just Newcastle, is a city located in the metropolitan borough of Tyne and Wear in the north east of England. Newcastle lies on the north bank of the River Tyne and is roughly 9 miles from the North Sea coast. The development of the seaport in the 16th century contributed to Newcastle's growth along with the shipyards that were located lower down the river towards the coast. At one time Newcastle was amongst the world's largest ship building and ship repairing centres. Modern day Newcastle's economy includes hosting many corporate headquarters, education, digital technologies, retail, tourism and other cultural centres.

Newcastle is world famous for a number of iconic brands: Newcastle Brown Ale, a brand of beer, Newcastle United Football Club, a Premier League football team and the Tyne Bridge. It is also home to the most popular half marathon, the Great North Run.

Newcastle's thriving Chinatown lies in the north-west of Grainger Town, centered on Stowell Street. A new Chinese arch, or paifang, providing a landmark entrance, was handed over to the city with a ceremony in 2005.

The UK's first biotechnology village, the "Centre for Life" is located in the city centre close to Newcastle Central railway station. The village is the first step in the City Council's plans to transform Newcastle into a science city.

About Plymouth

The city of Plymouth lies between the River Plym and the River Tamar in the south west of England. Both rivers flow into Plymouth Sound, a natural harbour. Plymouth Sound is protected from the sea by the Plymouth Breakwater, which has been in use since 1814. In the Sound is Drake's Island which is seen from Plymouth Hoe, a flat public area on top of limestone cliffs. The River Tamar forms the county boundary between Devon and Cornwall and its estuary upon which Devonport Dockyard sits.

Due to its position on the coast, Plymouth has historically had a maritime based economy particular in the defence sector. Devonport Dockyard is the United Kingdom's only naval base that refits nuclear submarines. Plymouth also has the largest grouping of maritime businesses in the south west of England. The city also has the Plymouth Gin Distillery which has been producing Plymouth Gin since 1793.

Built in 1815, Union Street was at the heart of Plymouth's historical culture. It became known as the servicemen's playground, as it was where sailors from the Royal Navy would seek entertainment of all kinds. During the 1930s, there were 30 pubs and it attracted such performers as Charlie Chaplin to the New Palace Theatre. It is now the late-night hub of Plymouth's entertainment strip.