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Nottingham Leeds Train

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About Nottingham

Nottingham is a city and county town of Nottinghamshire in the East Midlands of England. The city is famed for its link to the legend of Robin Hood and is also renowned for its lace making, bicycle and tobacco industries. Visitors to Nottingham have a huge range of things to do and places and buildings to see. Some of Nottingham's famous venues include the National Ice Centre, the National Water Sports Centre, its Test cricket ground, Trent Bridge, two professional football teams (Nottingham Forest and Notts County), and successful cricket and ice hockey teams.

Culturally, Nottingham is spoilt for choice. In addition to its vast range of bars, restaurants and night clubs the city has two large theatres, many museums and art galleries, an independent cinema and several live music venues including the Nottingham Arena and Rock City.

Nottingham has many different architectural styles with buildings dating back to the 12th century. The centre of Nottingham is usually regarded as the Old Market Square which is the largest city square in the UK. The square is overlooked by the Council House which was built in the 1920's and has baroque columns and stone statues of two lions at the front to stand guard over the square. On the ground floor of the Council House, Exchange Arcade is an upmarket shopping centre which has a number of high end boutiques.

About Leeds

The West Yorkshire city of Leeds can trace its origins back to the Middle Ages where it developed as a market town. Prior to the onset of the Industrial Revolution, Leeds became a coordination centre for the manufacture of woollen cloth and white broadcloth was traded at its White Cloth Hall. In 1770, the city was responsible for one sixth of the export trade of cloth. The construction of the Aire and Calder Navigation in 1699 and the Leeds and Liverpool Canal in 1816 spurred on the growth of textiles in Leeds. The next stage of the city's development came with the arrival of the railway network in the 1830's which connected Leeds to markets throughout the north of England and beyond. Specifically it connected Leeds to Manchester and the ports of Liverpool and Hull which improved access to international markets.

Leeds railway station offers passengers services to the suburbs of Leeds and beyond to the rest of the country. It is one of the busiest stations on the national rail network outside London. It also has the largest number of platforms of any railway station in the United Kingdom outside London.

Leeds Bradford Airport also provides passengers with many daily flights to destinations in the United Kingdom, Europe, Egypt, Tunisia, Pakistan and the USA.