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Peterborough London Train

Peterborough London trains depart from Peterborough station and arrive at London Kings Cross.

At direct rail you’ll find all UK train services with all of the train operators featured on the national rail network which means you are almost certain to find the ideal ticket on the line from Peterborough to London.

It’s never been easier to buy train tickets, not just between Peterborough and London but to and from any station on the national rail network.

To book your train ticket, simply start typing your departure and destination stations into the ticket search box and follow the prompts.

About Peterborough

Peterborough is a cathedral city located in the county of Cambridgeshire and is roughly 75 miles to the north of London. The city lies on the River Nene which goes on the flow into the North Sea. Visitors to Peterborough can enjoy wandering around the city and taking in the wonderful buildings and monuments. The Cathedral Church of Saint Peter. Saint Paul and Saint Andrew was originally founded as a monastery in AD 655 and rebuilt between 1118 and 1238. There is also the Peterborough Museum and Art Gallery, Burghley House, Longthorpe Tower and Thorpe Hall.

Peterborough enjoys a wide range of events including the annual East of England Show, Peterborough Festival and CAMRA beer festival, which takes place on the river embankment in late August. The Key Theatre, built in 1973, is situated on the embankment, next to the River Nene. The theatre aims to provide entertainment, enlightenment and education by reflecting the rich culture Peterborough has to offer. The programme is made up of home-grown productions, national touring shows, local community productions and one-off concerts.

Peterborough is a stop on the East Coast Main Line which has a journey time to London of around 50 minutes with high speed services from King's Cross to Edinburgh Waverley.

About London

London has too many buildings to be characterised by one architectural style. This is due, in part, to the varying ages of its buildings with dating back as far as the 11th century, such as The Tower of London. Many of London's large, opulent, houses and public buildings, such as the National Gallery, were constructed using Portland stone. However, different parts of the city have styles of their own. For example, the area to the west of central London is characterised by white stucco buildings. Although some do exist, few of London's surviving buildings pre-date the Great Fire of 1666. Those that do may have a trace of Roman remains or are of Tudor origins.

London is also a very green city with many parks and open spaces for inhabitants and visitors to enjoy. In central London there are a number of Royal Parks: Hyde Park and its neighbour Kensington Gardens, Regent's Park which is home to London Zoo, Green Park and St James's Park. Further out from the centre there is Greenwich Park, Bushey Park, Richmond Park and Victoria Park. Primrose Hill and Hampstead Heath to the north of Regent's Park are popular spots to view the ever changing London skyline.