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Portsmouth Bangor Train

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About Portsmouth

Most of the city f Portsmouth lies on Portsea Island which is located where the Solent joins the English Channel. The city is in the county of Hampshire and is the United Kingdom's only island city. Portsea Island is separated from the mainland by a narrow creek, which is known locally by Portsbridge Creek. Portsmouth Harbour lies to the west of Portsea Island and the large tidal bay of Langstone Harbour is to the east.

Portsmouth's main shopping district is centred around Commercial Road, Edinburgh Road, Arundel Street, Crasswell Street and Charlotte Street. The city also has the Cascades Shopping Centre where many high street stores can be found. Many of the city's bars and nightclubs, including The Lyberry, Skyebar, Astoria and POPworld, can be found on Guildhall Walk.

Portsmouth has three theatres: the New Theatre Royal in Guildhall Walk, near to the City Centre, which specialises in classical, modern and avant-garde drama, and the newly restored Kings Theatre in Southsea's Albert Road, which has many amateur musicals as well an increasing number of national tours. The other theatre is The Groundlings Theatre, situated in The Old Beneficial School, Portsea.

The city's Roman Catholic Cathedral can be found on Edinburgh Road and Victoria Park, to the west of the city centre, is also home to Portsmouth's second football team, the United Services Portsmouth Football Club.

About Bangor

The university city of Bangor in north west Wales can trace its history back to the founding of a monastery on the site of Bangor Cathedral by the Celtic saint Deiniol in the 6th century. The current cathedral is a more recent structure but the bishopric of Bangor is one of the oldest in Britain. The city's university was founded in 1884 and the Friars School, established as a free grammar school, was founded in 1557. In 1877, the former HMS Clio became a school ship, moored on the Menai Strait at Bangor, and had 260 pupils. Closed after the end of hostilities of World War I, she was sold for scrap and broken up in 1919.

The population of Bangor is around 14,000 and is therefore one of the smallest cities in the United Kingdom. However, because it is a university city it has more facilities than one would expect for a small city.

Around half of the people in the city can speak Welsh, but if you took away all of the students in the University, this figure would be much higher.