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Portsmouth Cardiff Train

If you’re looking for trains between England and Wales then you’re in the right place!

At direct rail you’ll find all UK train services with all of the train operators featured on the national rail network which means you are almost certain to find the ideal ticket on the line from Portsmouth to Cardiff.

It’s never been easier to buy train tickets, not just between Portsmouth and Cardiff but to and from any station on the national rail network.

To book your train ticket, simply start typing your departure and destination stations into the ticket search box and follow the prompts.

About Portsmouth

Portsmouth is a city located in the county of Hampshire on the south coast of England. It is the United Kingdom's only island city and has been a significant naval port for many centuries. The city is home to the oldest dry dock still in use and home to HMS Warrior, the Tudor carrack the Mary Rose and Lord Nelson's flagship, HMS Victory. The city remains a major dockyards and naval base for the Royal Navy and the Royal Marine Commandos. The port is also a busy commercial cruise ship and ferryport serving destinations on the continent for freight and passenger traffic.

A recent addition to Portsmouth's skyline in the Spinnaker Tower which can be found in a redeveloped part of Portsmouth, Gunwharf Quays, which includes retail outlets, restaurants, clubs and bars. The city has four established music venues: The Guildhall, The Wedgewood Rooms (which also includes a smaller venue, Edge of the Wedge), The Cellars At Eastney and Portsmouth Pyramids Centre. For many years a series of symphony concerts has been presented at the Guildhall by the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra. Outdoor performances by local acts also take place regularly at Southsea Bandstand.

About Cardiff

Cardiff is bordered to the west by the rural district of the Vale of Glamorgan—also known as The Garden of Cardiff— to the east by the city of Newport, to the north by the South Wales Valleys and to the south by the Severn Estuary and Bristol Channel. The River Taff winds through the centre of the city and together with the River Ely flows into the freshwater lake of Cardiff Bay. A third river, the Rhymney flows through the east of the city entering directly into the Severn Estuary. Its location and geographic features were influential in its development as the world's largest coal port, most notably its proximity and easy access to the coal fields of the south Wales valleys.

Today, Cardiff is the main financial and business centre in Wales and the city was recently placed seventh overall in the top 50 European cities and also ranked seventh in attracting foreign investment. Cardiff is one of the most popular tourist destination cities in the United Kingdom, receiving around 18 million visitors in 2010 and generating £852 million for the city's economy. There are a large number of hotels of varying sizes and standards in the city, providing almost 9,000 available bed spaces.