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Portsmouth London Train

At direct rail you’ll find all UK train services with all of the train operators featured on the national rail network which means you are almost certain to find the ideal ticket on the line from Portsmouth to London.

Fare types can sometimes come across a bit confusing but fear not, we make it simple for you to view the best ticket type for the journey between Portsmouth and London.

To book your train ticket, simply start typing your departure and destination stations into the ticket search box and follow the prompts.

About Portsmouth

Portsmouth is a city located in the county of Hampshire on the south coast of England. It is the United Kingdom's only island city and has been a significant naval port for many centuries. The city is home to the oldest dry dock still in use and home to HMS Warrior, the Tudor carrack the Mary Rose and Lord Nelson's flagship, HMS Victory. The city remains a major dockyards and naval base for the Royal Navy and the Royal Marine Commandos. The port is also a busy commercial cruise ship and ferryport serving destinations on the continent for freight and passenger traffic.

A recent addition to Portsmouth's skyline in the Spinnaker Tower which can be found in a redeveloped part of Portsmouth, Gunwharf Quays, which includes retail outlets, restaurants, clubs and bars. The city has four established music venues: The Guildhall, The Wedgewood Rooms (which also includes a smaller venue, Edge of the Wedge), The Cellars At Eastney and Portsmouth Pyramids Centre. For many years a series of symphony concerts has been presented at the Guildhall by the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra. Outdoor performances by local acts also take place regularly at Southsea Bandstand.

About London

London has too many buildings to be characterised by one architectural style. This is due, in part, to the varying ages of its buildings with dating back as far as the 11th century, such as The Tower of London. Many of London's large, opulent, houses and public buildings, such as the National Gallery, were constructed using Portland stone. However, different parts of the city have styles of their own. For example, the area to the west of central London is characterised by white stucco buildings. Although some do exist, few of London's surviving buildings pre-date the Great Fire of 1666. Those that do may have a trace of Roman remains or are of Tudor origins.

London is also a very green city with many parks and open spaces for inhabitants and visitors to enjoy. In central London there are a number of Royal Parks: Hyde Park and its neighbour Kensington Gardens, Regent's Park which is home to London Zoo, Green Park and St James's Park. Further out from the centre there is Greenwich Park, Bushey Park, Richmond Park and Victoria Park. Primrose Hill and Hampstead Heath to the north of Regent's Park are popular spots to view the ever changing London skyline.