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Preston Birmingham Train

The Preston Birmingham train connection travels between the stations of Preston and Birmingham New Street.

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We offer the cheapest tickets from Preston to Birmingham as well as open/flexible return tickets, so ensure you get the best fare and book your train ticket in advance with us now!

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About Preston

Preston is a city in Lancashire in the north west of England. The city lies on the banks of the River Ribble which forms the southern boundary of the city. To the north east is the Forest of Bowland and the Fylde lies to the west. The city is roughly 30 miles to the north west of Manchester and 25 miles to the north east of Liverpool. Textiles have been produced in Preston since the 13th century and the inventor of the spinning frame, Sir Richard Arkwright, was born in Preston.

Landmarks to enjoy in Preston include St. Walburge's Church, which at 94 meters has the tallest spire on a church that is not a cathedral in England, the Miller Arcade, the Town Hall, the Harris Museum, the Minster Church of St. John the Evangelist, the former Corn Exchange and Public Hall, St. Wilfrid's Catholic Church and many other Georgian buildings on Winckley Square.

Preston railway station is a major stop on the West Coast Main Line with regular services to London Euston and the south east of England, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Aberdeen and Fort William. It is also an important rail hub for local and regional services for the north west of England.

About Birmingham

In recent years the city of Birmingham has evolved from its industrial roots into a modern, thriving and cultural city. The redevelopment of the Bullring Shopping Centre and also of the old industrial areas such as Brindleyplace, The Mailbox and the International Convention Centre have all played their part in the rejuvenation of the city. Old streets, buildings and canals have been restored to create a city for the 21st century.

Birmingham, along with the residential borough of Solihull and Wolverhampton, along with the industrial towns of the Black Country, together form the West Midlands Built-up Area which covers around 230 square miles. Surrounding this, is Birmingham's metropolitan area which includes Tamworth and the cities of Lichfield in Staffordshire, Coventry, Nuneaton, Warwick, Leamington Spa and the towns of Redditch and Bromsgrove in Warwickshire.

Birmingham is also a very green city with 571 parks which is more than any other European city. Sutton Park covers 2,400 acres and is the largest urban park in Europe and a National Nature Reserve. Birmingham Botanical Gardens, located close to the city centre, retains the regency landscape of its original design by J. C. Loudon in 1829,while the Winterbourne Botanic Garden in Edgbaston reflects the more informal Arts and Crafts tastes of its Edwardian origins.