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Preston Birmingham Train

The Preston Birmingham train connection travels between the stations of Preston and Birmingham New Street. offer cheap train tickets with all UK train companies to and from all National Rail stations, not just in cities, but towns and villages too.

We offer the cheapest tickets from Preston to Birmingham as well as open/flexible return tickets, so ensure you get the best fare and book your train ticket in advance with us now!

Get your live Preston departures and Birmingham arrival times, availability and durations now by inputting the relevant information into our search box.

About Preston

The city of Preston was granted city status in 2002 and is located in the north west of England in the county of Lancashire. Preston was transformed during the 19th century from a small market town to a much larger industrial town. Innovations which occurred during the second half of the 19th century, such as Richard Arkwright's water frame (which was invented in Preston) attracted cotton mills to many northern towns in England, including Preston. The prosperity of the town led to it becoming the first town in England after London to be lit by gas.

The River Ribble forms Preston's southern border and the Forest of Bowland lies beyond the city and the Fylde coastal plain lies to the west. There are a number of museums worth visiting in the city. These include the Harris Museum and Art Gallery, the Broughton Cottage Museum, the Queen's Lancashire Regiment Museum and the Ribble Steam Railway. The city, and its surrounding area, is also home to a number of nature reserves: Grange Valley, Holls and Hollows, Pope Lane Field and Boilton Wood and the Fishwick Nature Reserve.

About Birmingham

The city of Birmingham, located in the West Midlands region of England, was known in Victorian times as the "City of a 1,000 trades" and the "Workshop of the World" which is recognition of the city's traditional industrial path.

The city centre is partially pedestrianised and most of the city's attractions can be reached on foot. Many visitors enjoy the walk from the International Convention Centre (the ICC) and the Symphony Hall to the Bull Ring Shopping Centre. This is a walk of roughly 20 minutes but allow much longer if you want to stop on the way. The Bullring Shopping Centre has recently been redeveloped and now offers shoppers a vast range of shops, including Selfridges, bars and restaurants to while away the hours. Other shopping destinations in the city include the Pavilions shopping centre, The Mailbox and the Pallasades which is located above Birmingham New Street railway station.

Birmingham also has a large canal network and the area immediately adjoining the canals in the city centre have been developed over recent years and now offer visitors an enhanced environment and high level of amenities. The canal paths make excellent walking routes.