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Preston London Train

The Preston London train connection travels between the stations of Preston and London Euston.

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About Preston

Preston is a city in Lancashire in the north west of England. The city lies on the banks of the River Ribble which forms the southern boundary of the city. To the north east is the Forest of Bowland and the Fylde lies to the west. The city is roughly 30 miles to the north west of Manchester and 25 miles to the north east of Liverpool. Textiles have been produced in Preston since the 13th century and the inventor of the spinning frame, Sir Richard Arkwright, was born in Preston.

Landmarks to enjoy in Preston include St. Walburge's Church, which at 94 meters has the tallest spire on a church that is not a cathedral in England, the Miller Arcade, the Town Hall, the Harris Museum, the Minster Church of St. John the Evangelist, the former Corn Exchange and Public Hall, St. Wilfrid's Catholic Church and many other Georgian buildings on Winckley Square.

Preston railway station is a major stop on the West Coast Main Line with regular services to London Euston and the south east of England, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Aberdeen and Fort William. It is also an important rail hub for local and regional services for the north west of England.

About London

London has too many buildings to be characterised by one architectural style. This is due, in part, to the varying ages of its buildings with dating back as far as the 11th century, such as The Tower of London. Many of London's large, opulent, houses and public buildings, such as the National Gallery, were constructed using Portland stone. However, different parts of the city have styles of their own. For example, the area to the west of central London is characterised by white stucco buildings. Although some do exist, few of London's surviving buildings pre-date the Great Fire of 1666. Those that do may have a trace of Roman remains or are of Tudor origins.

London is also a very green city with many parks and open spaces for inhabitants and visitors to enjoy. In central London there are a number of Royal Parks: Hyde Park and its neighbour Kensington Gardens, Regent's Park which is home to London Zoo, Green Park and St James's Park. Further out from the centre there is Greenwich Park, Bushey Park, Richmond Park and Victoria Park. Primrose Hill and Hampstead Heath to the north of Regent's Park are popular spots to view the ever changing London skyline.