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Salisbury Chichester Train

At direct rail you’ll find all UK train services with all of the train operators featured on the national rail network which means you are almost certain to find the ideal ticket on the line from Salisbury to Chichester.

We offer the cheapest tickets from Salisbury to Chichester as well as open/flexible return tickets, so ensure you get the best fare and book your train ticket in advance with us now!

On many routes you can save on average 43% by buying your ticket in advance in comparison to buying at your local station on the day of travel. So what are you waiting for? Search for your train fares from Salisbury to Chichester now.

About Salisbury

Salisbury is a cathedral city located in the county of Wiltshire and lies at the edge of Salisbury Plain. The city also lies on the confluence of five rivers: the Nadder, Ebble, Wylye, the Bourne and a tributary of the River Avon. Salisbury cathedral is formally known as the Cathedral Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary, is one of the leading examples of Early English architecture. The main part of the cathedral was completed between 1220 and 1258. The cathedral's spire is the tallest in the UK and 123m. Visitors are able to take the "Tower Tour" where the interior of the spire can be viewed. The cathedral also has the largest cloister and the largest cathedral close in Britain. It also houses the world's oldest working clock, from AD 1386.

The UNESCO World Heritage Site, Stonehenge, is just under 10 miles from Salisbury which attracts many visitors to Salisbury. The Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum is located in the King's House which is a Grade I listed building dating back to the 13th century. The Pitt Rivers gallery contains a collection from General Augustus Pitt Rivers who is often regarded as the "father of modern archeology".

About Chichester

The West Sussex city of Chichester is home to the 11th century Chichester Cathedral which contains the shrine to Saint Richard of Chichester. Contained within the cathedral, in the south aisle, is a window in the floor which enables visitors to see the remains of a Roman mosaic pavement. The cathedral is unusual in the United Kingdom because it has a separate bell tower located a few meters from the main building. Philp Larkin, the renowned poet, took inspiration for the poem "An Arundel Tomb" from the medieval tomb of a knight and his wife which is inside the cathedral.

Most of the architecture of the Roman town within Chichester has been declared a conservation area that contains many Grade I listed buildings. The Butter Market in North Street was designed by John Nash, and was opened in 1808 as a food and produce market. In 1900, a second story was added to the building, originally housing an arts institute. The Corn Exchange in East Street was built in 1833, and was one of the first in the country. It is an imposing building, designed to show off its importance to trade. In 1883 it was also used for drama and entertainment.