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Salisbury Newcastle Train

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About Salisbury

Salisbury is a cathedral city located in the county of Wiltshire and lies at the edge of Salisbury Plain. The city also lies on the confluence of five rivers: the Nadder, Ebble, Wylye, the Bourne and a tributary of the River Avon. Salisbury cathedral is formally known as the Cathedral Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary, is one of the leading examples of Early English architecture. The main part of the cathedral was completed between 1220 and 1258. The cathedral's spire is the tallest in the UK and 123m. Visitors are able to take the "Tower Tour" where the interior of the spire can be viewed. The cathedral also has the largest cloister and the largest cathedral close in Britain. It also houses the world's oldest working clock, from AD 1386.

The UNESCO World Heritage Site, Stonehenge, is just under 10 miles from Salisbury which attracts many visitors to Salisbury. The Salisbury and South Wiltshire Museum is located in the King's House which is a Grade I listed building dating back to the 13th century. The Pitt Rivers gallery contains a collection from General Augustus Pitt Rivers who is often regarded as the "father of modern archeology".

About Newcastle

The north east city of Newcastle upon Tyne still retains its medieval street layout, and its narrow alleys are perhaps most prevalent around the riverside area of the city. Stairs from the riverside to higher parts of the city centre and the Castle Keep, which were originally recorded in the 14th century, still remain.

To the north west of the city centre is Leazes Park which was established in 1873 following a petition by local residents to have access to some open spaces for health and recreation. Just outside the park is St James' Park football stadium, home to Newcastle United Football Club. The stadium, which has a capacity of just over 52,000, dominates the view of the city from all directions. Another green space enjoyed by residents and visitors alike is Town Moor which is located to the north of the city centre. It is larger than London's Hyde Park and Hampstead Heath combined. In the south eastern corner of the city is Exhibition Park, which contains the only remaining pavilion from the North East Coast Exhibition of 1929. Since the 1970s this has housed the Newcastle Military Vehicle Museum although this is now closed.