Direct Rail
Book In Advance
Travel from Southampton to Leeds by train
Get The Best Deals
Book in advance and save £’s versus standard walk on fares

Southampton Leeds Train

Directrail.com offer cheap train tickets with all UK train companies to and from all National Rail stations, not just in cities, but towns and villages too.

We offer the cheapest tickets from Southampton to Leeds as well as open/flexible return tickets, so ensure you get the best fare and book your train ticket in advance with us now!

On many routes you can save on average 43% by buying your ticket in advance in comparison to buying at your local station on the day of travel. So what are you waiting for? Search for your train fares from Southampton to Leeds now.

About Southampton

Southampton is the largest city in Hampshire on the south coast of England. The city lies at the northern tip of Southampton Water, where the rivers Test and Itchen converge. The River Test runs along the western edge of the city. It is roughly 75 miles to the south west of London and around 20 miles to the west of Portsmouth. The Port of Southampton is a major cruise ship terminal and ferry port. The ferryport is no longer home to any international ferry operations but it is the terminus for three ferry services to the Isle if Wight. Southampton's tradition of luxury cruising began in around 1840. Many of the world's largest cruise ships can regularly be seen in the port including vessels from Royal Caribbean and Carnival Corporation, which includes brands including Princess Cruises and Cunard Line.

Southampton has two large live music venues, the Mayflower Theatre and the Guildhall. The Guildhall has seen concerts from a wide range of popular artists including Pink Floyd, David Bowie, Manic Street Preachers, The Killers, The Kaiser Chiefs and Amy Winehouse. It also hosts classical concerts presented by the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra, City of Southampton Orchestra, Southampton Concert Orchestra, Southampton Philharmonic Choir and Southampton Choral Society.

About Leeds

The West Yorkshire city of Leeds can trace its origins back to the Middle Ages where it developed as a market town. Prior to the onset of the Industrial Revolution, Leeds became a coordination centre for the manufacture of woollen cloth and white broadcloth was traded at its White Cloth Hall. In 1770, the city was responsible for one sixth of the export trade of cloth. The construction of the Aire and Calder Navigation in 1699 and the Leeds and Liverpool Canal in 1816 spurred on the growth of textiles in Leeds. The next stage of the city's development came with the arrival of the railway network in the 1830's which connected Leeds to markets throughout the north of England and beyond. Specifically it connected Leeds to Manchester and the ports of Liverpool and Hull which improved access to international markets.

Leeds railway station offers passengers services to the suburbs of Leeds and beyond to the rest of the country. It is one of the busiest stations on the national rail network outside London. It also has the largest number of platforms of any railway station in the United Kingdom outside London.

Leeds Bradford Airport also provides passengers with many daily flights to destinations in the United Kingdom, Europe, Egypt, Tunisia, Pakistan and the USA.