Direct Rail
Book In Advance
Travel from Southampton to London by train
Get The Best Deals
Book in advance and save £’s versus standard walk on fares

Southampton London Train

At direct rail we’re completely impartial and our aim is to help you find the best fare for your Southampton to London rail journey, quickly, securely and hassle free.

We offer the cheapest tickets from Southampton to London as well as open/flexible return tickets, so ensure you get the best fare and book your train ticket in advance with us now!

On many routes you can save on average 43% by buying your ticket in advance in comparison to buying at your local station on the day of travel. So what are you waiting for? Search for your train fares from Southampton to London now.

About Southampton

Southampton is the largest city in Hampshire on the south coast of England. The city lies at the northern tip of Southampton Water, where the rivers Test and Itchen converge. The River Test runs along the western edge of the city. It is roughly 75 miles to the south west of London and around 20 miles to the west of Portsmouth. The Port of Southampton is a major cruise ship terminal and ferry port. The ferryport is no longer home to any international ferry operations but it is the terminus for three ferry services to the Isle if Wight. Southampton's tradition of luxury cruising began in around 1840. Many of the world's largest cruise ships can regularly be seen in the port including vessels from Royal Caribbean and Carnival Corporation, which includes brands including Princess Cruises and Cunard Line.

Southampton has two large live music venues, the Mayflower Theatre and the Guildhall. The Guildhall has seen concerts from a wide range of popular artists including Pink Floyd, David Bowie, Manic Street Preachers, The Killers, The Kaiser Chiefs and Amy Winehouse. It also hosts classical concerts presented by the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra, City of Southampton Orchestra, Southampton Concert Orchestra, Southampton Philharmonic Choir and Southampton Choral Society.

About London

London has too many buildings to be characterised by one architectural style. This is due, in part, to the varying ages of its buildings with dating back as far as the 11th century, such as The Tower of London. Many of London's large, opulent, houses and public buildings, such as the National Gallery, were constructed using Portland stone. However, different parts of the city have styles of their own. For example, the area to the west of central London is characterised by white stucco buildings. Although some do exist, few of London's surviving buildings pre-date the Great Fire of 1666. Those that do may have a trace of Roman remains or are of Tudor origins.

London is also a very green city with many parks and open spaces for inhabitants and visitors to enjoy. In central London there are a number of Royal Parks: Hyde Park and its neighbour Kensington Gardens, Regent's Park which is home to London Zoo, Green Park and St James's Park. Further out from the centre there is Greenwich Park, Bushey Park, Richmond Park and Victoria Park. Primrose Hill and Hampstead Heath to the north of Regent's Park are popular spots to view the ever changing London skyline.