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Stoke On Trent Brighton Train

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About Stoke On Trent

Stoke-on-Trent, often referred to as just Stoke, is a city in Staffordshire in England. The city lies approximately midway between Manchester and Birmingham. The Peak District lies to the east of the city. The city is regarded as the home of the pottery industry in England and as a result is also sometimes called the Potteries. The city's association with pottery began in the 17th century and has world famous companies such as Royal Doulton, Dudson Ltd, Spode, Wedgwood, Minton and Baker & Co. The city has also thrived in the past on the back of coal mining and steel production.

Visitors to Stoke-on-Trent can enjoy many attractions including the Potteries Museum and Art Gallery, the Eturia Industrial Museum and the Gladstone Pottery Museum. For visitors looking for a more thrill-seeking experience, the Alton Towers Resort is roughly 10 miles from the city and is in itself one of the United Kingdom's best known, and most visited, attractions.

The main shopping centre is the Potteries Shopping Centre in Hanley which includes department stores, many high street national chain stores and some independent stores.

Stoke-on-Trent railway station is a mainline station on the Stafford-Manchester Line (part of the West Coast Main Line between Manchester and London) and the Crewe-Derby Line.

About Brighton

Brighton can trace its origins back to Brightelmstone which dates back to before the Domesday Book (1086) but developed as a health resort and spa during the 18th century. It was frequently used by the then Prince Regent and became a popular destination for Londoners to escape the city, especially the following the arrival of the railway in the 1840's.

Brighton's traditional economy for its first 700 years was centred on the fishing industry. Land called the Hempshares, the site of the present Lanes) provided hemp for ropes and sails were made from flax which was grown in nearby Hove. Fishing nets were dried and boast were kept on land which became Old Steine and fishermen lived and worked on the foreshore below east cliff. Herring and mackerel were the main products, but plaice, cod and conger eels were also fished.

In the 18th century the economy diversified as the town grew. Small-scale foundries were established, especially in the North Laine area; coal importers such as the Brighthelmston Coal Company set up business to receive fuel sent from Newcastle; and the rise of tourism and fashionable society was reflected in the proliferation of lodging house keepers, day and boarding school proprietors, dressmakers, milliners and jewellers.