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Sunderland Durham Train

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About Sunderland

Sunderland is a city in Tyne and Wear in the north east of England. It lies at the mouth of the River Wear which also runs through the city with the two sides of the city connected by the Queen Alexandra Bridge at Pallion and the Wearmouth Bridge just north of the city centre. Much of the city is located on a low range of hills running parallel to the coast.

Over the centuries the city grew as a port, trading coal and salt. The city also began shipbuilding in the 14th century and was once regarded as being the "Largest Shipbuilding Town in the World" and by the 19th century Sunderland had grown to absorb Bishopwearmouth and Monkwearmouth.

Following the decline in the city's shipbuilding, the shipyards along the Wear were redeveloped into a mixture of residential, commercial and leisure facilities which includes St. Peter's Campus of the University of Sunderland, the North Haven housing and marina development, the National Glass Centre, the Stadium of Light, home to Sunderland Football Club, and the Riverside Retail Park. Adjacent to the Stadium of Light is the Sunderland Aquatic Centre which contains the only Olympic size swimming pool between Leeds and Edinburgh.

About Durham

The city of Durham's old commercial area included the peninsular on three sides, following the River Wear. The peninsular was surrounded by the castle wall which ran from the castle keep and included two gatehouses on the north side and the west side of the enclosure. The Victorians removed the city wall but retained the gatehouse which still remains standing on the Bailey.

Durham's medieval city comprised the cathedral, castle and administrative buildings on the peninsular. The area around the North Road part of the city underwent a transformation during the 1960's which was championed by Durham City Council. Most of the medieval street plan remains although most of the medieval buildings have disappeared apart from the House of Correction and the Chapel of Saint Andrew which are both under Elvet Bridge.

The River Wear provides around 1800 m of river that can be rowed on, stretching from Old Durham Beck in the east to the weir next to Durham School Boat Club's boat house in the west. This includes the 700 m straight used for most of the Durham Regatta races and some challenging navigation through the arches of Elvet Bridge, reputed to be the narrowest row through bridge in Europe, and the bends of the river round the peninsula.