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Truro Plymouth Train

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About Truro

Truro is a city and civil parish in Cornwall in the south west of the United Kingdom. The city is the administrative centre of Cornwall and also its leisure and retail centre. The city is roughly 10 miles from the confluence of the rivers Kenwyn and Allen which both combine to become the Truro River which flows into the River Fal. The rivers form a bowl surrounding the city to the north, east and west. Close to the city are a number of protected natural areas including the parklands at Pencalenick and the larger ornamental landscape such as Trelissick Garden and Tregothnan. Calenick Creek, to the south east of the city, has been declared an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

The Cathedral of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Truro is an Anglican cathedral located in the centre of the city. It was built in the Gothic Revival architectural style fashionable during much of the nineteenth century, and is one of only three cathedrals in the United Kingdom with three spires.

The main attraction for local residents in the region is the wide variety of shops the city has to offer which includes a selection of chain stores, specialty shops and markets. The indoor Pannier Market is open year-round with many stalls and small businesses. The city is also a popular destination for nightlife with many bars, clubs and restaurants opening. Truro is also known for the Hall for Cornwall, a performing arts and entertainment venue.

About Plymouth

The city of Plymouth lies between the River Plym and the River Tamar in the south west of England. Both rivers flow into Plymouth Sound, a natural harbour. Plymouth Sound is protected from the sea by the Plymouth Breakwater, which has been in use since 1814. In the Sound is Drake's Island which is seen from Plymouth Hoe, a flat public area on top of limestone cliffs. The River Tamar forms the county boundary between Devon and Cornwall and its estuary upon which Devonport Dockyard sits.

Due to its position on the coast, Plymouth has historically had a maritime based economy particular in the defence sector. Devonport Dockyard is the United Kingdom's only naval base that refits nuclear submarines. Plymouth also has the largest grouping of maritime businesses in the south west of England. The city also has the Plymouth Gin Distillery which has been producing Plymouth Gin since 1793.

Built in 1815, Union Street was at the heart of Plymouth's historical culture. It became known as the servicemen's playground, as it was where sailors from the Royal Navy would seek entertainment of all kinds. During the 1930s, there were 30 pubs and it attracted such performers as Charlie Chaplin to the New Palace Theatre. It is now the late-night hub of Plymouth's entertainment strip.