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Wakefield Nottingham Train

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About Wakefield

The city of Wakefield is located in West Yorkshire and lies by the River Calder on the eastern edge of the Pennines. The city is roughly 9 miles to the south east of Leeds and 30 miles to the south west of York. The centre of the city is on a hill on the north bank of the River Calder close to where a 14th century stone bridge crosses the river. The city was called the "Merrie City" in the middle ages and during the 18th century it developed as a result in its trade in corn, coal mining and textiles.

Major landmarks in the city include its cathedral which is 75m tall and is the tallest spire in Yorkshire, the Grade II listed Neoclassical Crown Court constructed in 1810 and Wakefield Town Hall constructed in 1880. Another prominent structure is the 95-arch railway viaduct, constructed of 800,000,000 bricks in the 1860s on the Doncaster to Leeds railway line. At its northern end is a bridge with an 80-foot span over Westgate and at its southern end a 163-foot iron bridge crossing the River Calder. Also, the old Wakefield Bridge with its Chantry Chapel, Sandal Castle, and Lawe Hill in Clarence Park are ancient monuments.[

About Nottingham

The East Midlands city of Nottingham, famed for its Lace making and the legend of Robin Hood, is home to two universities: Nottingham Trent University and the University of Nottingham. Many of the industrial buildings in the city have been redeveloped and have helped modern day Nottingham become a thriving centre for education and commerce. The Lace Market, which is to the south of Hockley, has many streets full of red brick warehouses which have been converted into apartments, bars and restaurants. Adams Building is now used by New College Nottingham.

Ye Olde Trip To Jerusalem (The Trip), partially built into the cave system beneath Nottingham Castle, is a contender for the title of "England's Oldest Pub" due to its supposed establishment in 1189. However, The Bell Inn on the Old Market Square, and Ye Olde Salutation Inn (The Salutation) on Maid Marian Way, have both supposed to have disputed this claim. Whichever is the case it is safe to say that Nottingham has several public houses that date back to around the 11th century, or perhaps earlier.

There are two main shopping centres in Nottingham: Victoria Centre and the Broadmarsh Centre. The Victoria Centre was established on the site of the former Nottingham Victoria railway station, and was the first to be built in the city.