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Wolverhampton London Train

The Wolverhampton London train connection travels between the stations of Wolverhampton and London Euston.

Use the direct rail train times and ticket search box to get all the information you need on trains from Wolverhampton to London including schedules, all available fare types from anytime peak to super-off peak.

It’s never been easier to buy train tickets, not just between Wolverhampton and London but to and from any station on the national rail network.

To book your train ticket, simply start typing your departure and destination stations into the ticket search box and follow the prompts.

About Wolverhampton

Wolverhampton is a city located in the West Midlands in England and lies to the north west of Birmingham. Also, to the north and east lies the countryside of Staffordshire and Shropshire. The city itself lies on the Midlands Plateau and at 120m above sea level it is the highest city centre in the UK. Unusually, there are no rivers within the city although several rivers rise in the city: the rivers Tame and Penk.

The city grew as a market town which focused on the woollen trade. Following the Industrial Revolution the city became a major industrial centre with coal mining, limestone mining and iron ore mining along with steel, locks, motorcycles and car production. Modern day Wolverhampton has retained some of its engineering heritage, including a large aerospace industry, and also in the service sector.

The city has a number of venues, museums and other public buildings that all lend to its cultural offering to visitors. The Grand Theatre in Wolverhampton's largest theatre which opened in 1894 and has featured the actors Charlie Chaplin and Sean Connery. It was also used by Winston Churchill. The Arena Theatre, which is part of the University of Wolverhampton, is the city's second largest theatre and hosts both amateur and professional performances.

About London

London has too many buildings to be characterised by one architectural style. This is due, in part, to the varying ages of its buildings with dating back as far as the 11th century, such as The Tower of London. Many of London's large, opulent, houses and public buildings, such as the National Gallery, were constructed using Portland stone. However, different parts of the city have styles of their own. For example, the area to the west of central London is characterised by white stucco buildings. Although some do exist, few of London's surviving buildings pre-date the Great Fire of 1666. Those that do may have a trace of Roman remains or are of Tudor origins.

London is also a very green city with many parks and open spaces for inhabitants and visitors to enjoy. In central London there are a number of Royal Parks: Hyde Park and its neighbour Kensington Gardens, Regent's Park which is home to London Zoo, Green Park and St James's Park. Further out from the centre there is Greenwich Park, Bushey Park, Richmond Park and Victoria Park. Primrose Hill and Hampstead Heath to the north of Regent's Park are popular spots to view the ever changing London skyline.