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Worcester Birmingham Train

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About Worcester

Worcester is a city and country town of Worcestershire in the West Midlands of England. The city is roughly 17 miles to the south west of Birmingham and has the River Severn running through its centre. The city is also overlooked by Worcester Cathedral which was constructed in the 12th century. It is also the site of the last battle of the Civil War and was where Oliver Cromwell's New Model Army defeated King Charles II's Cavaliers. The city was also home to composer Sir Edward Elgar for much of his life.

Interestingly, Worcester was known for its glove making industry which peaked in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. During this period it employed 30,000 people and around half the glove manufacturers in the United Kingdom were based in Worcester. By the end of the 20th century three manufacturers remained in the city. Another of the city's famous products is Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce which has been made and bottled in the city since 1897.

The city's main shopping areas are its High Street, The Shambles, Broad Street, the CrownGate Shopping Centre, Cathedral Plaza and Reindeer Court. The Cross, and surrounding area, is home to the city's financial centre and where many of Worcester's bank branches are located.

About Birmingham

In recent years the city of Birmingham has evolved from its industrial roots into a modern, thriving and cultural city. The redevelopment of the Bullring Shopping Centre and also of the old industrial areas such as Brindleyplace, The Mailbox and the International Convention Centre have all played their part in the rejuvenation of the city. Old streets, buildings and canals have been restored to create a city for the 21st century.

Birmingham, along with the residential borough of Solihull and Wolverhampton, along with the industrial towns of the Black Country, together form the West Midlands Built-up Area which covers around 230 square miles. Surrounding this, is Birmingham's metropolitan area which includes Tamworth and the cities of Lichfield in Staffordshire, Coventry, Nuneaton, Warwick, Leamington Spa and the towns of Redditch and Bromsgrove in Warwickshire.

Birmingham is also a very green city with 571 parks which is more than any other European city. Sutton Park covers 2,400 acres and is the largest urban park in Europe and a National Nature Reserve. Birmingham Botanical Gardens, located close to the city centre, retains the regency landscape of its original design by J. C. Loudon in 1829,while the Winterbourne Botanic Garden in Edgbaston reflects the more informal Arts and Crafts tastes of its Edwardian origins.