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Worcester London Train

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We offer the cheapest train tickets from Worcester to London as well as open/flexible return tickets, so get the best fare for by booking in advance with directrail.com now!

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About Worcester

Worcester is a city and country town of Worcestershire in the West Midlands of England. The city is roughly 17 miles to the south west of Birmingham and has the River Severn running through its centre. The city is also overlooked by Worcester Cathedral which was constructed in the 12th century. It is also the site of the last battle of the Civil War and was where Oliver Cromwell's New Model Army defeated King Charles II's Cavaliers. The city was also home to composer Sir Edward Elgar for much of his life.

Interestingly, Worcester was known for its glove making industry which peaked in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. During this period it employed 30,000 people and around half the glove manufacturers in the United Kingdom were based in Worcester. By the end of the 20th century three manufacturers remained in the city. Another of the city's famous products is Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce which has been made and bottled in the city since 1897.

The city's main shopping areas are its High Street, The Shambles, Broad Street, the CrownGate Shopping Centre, Cathedral Plaza and Reindeer Court. The Cross, and surrounding area, is home to the city's financial centre and where many of Worcester's bank branches are located.

About London

London has too many buildings to be characterised by one architectural style. This is due, in part, to the varying ages of its buildings with dating back as far as the 11th century, such as The Tower of London. Many of London's large, opulent, houses and public buildings, such as the National Gallery, were constructed using Portland stone. However, different parts of the city have styles of their own. For example, the area to the west of central London is characterised by white stucco buildings. Although some do exist, few of London's surviving buildings pre-date the Great Fire of 1666. Those that do may have a trace of Roman remains or are of Tudor origins.

London is also a very green city with many parks and open spaces for inhabitants and visitors to enjoy. In central London there are a number of Royal Parks: Hyde Park and its neighbour Kensington Gardens, Regent's Park which is home to London Zoo, Green Park and St James's Park. Further out from the centre there is Greenwich Park, Bushey Park, Richmond Park and Victoria Park. Primrose Hill and Hampstead Heath to the north of Regent's Park are popular spots to view the ever changing London skyline.