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About York

The North Yorkshire city of York is dominated by York Minster, York's 13th century cathedral. The city centre is enclosed by medieval walls and are the most complete in England. They have the only walls set on high ramparts and they retain all their principal gateways and are a popular walk for many visitors. A feature of central York is the Snickelways which are narrow pedestrian routes, many of which led towards the former market-places in Pavement and St Sampson's Square. The Shambles is a narrow medieval street, lined with shops, boutiques and tea rooms. Most of these premises were once butchers' shops, and the hooks from which carcasses were hung and the shelves on which meat was laid out can still be seen outside some of them. Goodramgate has many medieval houses including the early 14th century Lady Row built to finance a Chantry, at the edge of the churchyard of Holy Trinity church.

York has many museums and historic buildings such as the Yorkshire Museum and its Museum Gardens, JORVIK Viking Centre, the York Art Gallery, the Richard III Museum, the Merchant Adventurers' Hall, the 18th century Fairfax House, the Mansion House and the Treasurer's House.

About Gloucester

The city of Gloucester is located in the county of Gloucestershire and lies close to the border with Wales. The city, which also lies on the River Severn, has a rich past dating back to Roman times. At the heart of the city, and standing in College Green, is the Norman cathedral with its breathtaking fan-vaulted cloisters and great east window. From the cathedral it is only a short walk down narrow cobbled streets, past historical buildings, to the main shopping area in the city. From there it is, once again, a short walk to the Victorian Docks with its now converted warehouses. In the docks you are likely to see all manner of vessels from narrow boats to sea going ships. The city is also an excellent base from which to explore the surrounding area and take in the splendour of the Cotswolds and the Forest of Dean. The Cotswolds is an area of rolling hills which rise from the meadows of the upper Thames to an escarpment, known as the Cotswold Edge, above the Severn Valley and Evesham Vale. The Forest of Dean is an area of mixed ancient woodland and forms a roughly triangular plateau bounded by the River Wye to the west and north, the River Severn to the south, and the City of Gloucester to the east.